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AES

Advanced Encryption Standard

Key sizes   128, 192 or 256 bits

Block sizes 128 bits

Rounds      10, 12 or 14

AES/CBC/NOPADDING

AES 128 bit Encryption in CBC Mode (Counter Block Mode ) PKCS5 Padding

AES/CBC/PKCS5PADDING

AES 128 bit Encryption in ECB Mode (Electronic Code Book Mode ) No Padding

AES/ECB/NOPADDING

AES 128 bit Encryption in ECB Mode (Electronic Code Book Mode ) No Padding

AES/ECB/PKCS5PADDING

AES 128 bit Encryption in ECB Mode (Electronic Code Book Mode ) PKCS5PADDING

AES_128/CBC/NOPADDING

AES 128 bit Encryption in CBC Mode (Counter Block Mode ) No Padding, CBC requires Initial Vector

AES_128/CFB/NOPADDING

AES 128 bit Encryption in CBC Mode (Cipher Feedback Mode ) No Padding, CBC requires Initial Vector

AES_128/ECB/NOPADDING

 

AES_128/GCM/NOPADDING

GCM Mode

AES_128/OFB/NOPADDING

Aes Encryption in Output Feedback Mode

AES_192/CBC/NOPADDING

Aes 192 bit encryption in CBC Mode

AES_192/CFB/NOPADDING

Aes 192 bit encryption in CFB Mode

AES_192/ECB/NOPADDING

Aes 192 bit encryption in ECB Mode, ECB Mode doesn’t require any Initial Vector

AES_192/GCM/NOPADDING

Aes 192 bit encryption in GCM mode

AES_192/OFB/NOPADDING

Aes 192 bit encryption in ofb mode

AES_256/CBC/NOPADDING

Aes 256 bit encryption in cbc mode

AES_256/CFB/NOPADDING

Aes 256 bit encryption in CFB mode

AES_256/ECB/NOPADDING

Aes 256 bit encryption in ECB mode

AES_256/GCM/NOPADDING

Aes 256 bit encryption in GCM mode

AES_256/OFB/NOPADDING

Aes 256 bit encryption in OFB mode

ARIA

Derived from      AES

Key sizes   128, 192, or 256 bits

Block sizes 128 bits

BLOWFISH

Designers   Bruce Schneier

First published   1993

Successors  Twofish

Cipher detail

Key sizes   32–448 bits

Block sizes 64 bits

Structure   Feistel network

Rounds      16

CAMELLIA

Designers   Mitsubishi Electric, NTT

First published   2000

Derived from      E2, MISTY1

Certification     CRYPTREC, NESSIE

Cipher detail

Key sizes   128, 192 or 256 bits

Block sizes 128 bits

Structure   Feistel network

Rounds      18 or 24

CAST5/ CAST6

Designers   Carlisle Adams and Stafford Tavares

First published   1996

Successors  CAST-256

Cipher detail

Key sizes   40 to 128 bits

Block sizes 64 bits

Structure   Feistel network

Rounds      12 or 16

CHACHA

Designers   Daniel J. Bernstein

First published   2007

Related to  Rumba20, ChaCha

Certification     eSTREAM portfolio

Cipher detail

Key sizes   256 bits

State size  512 bits

Structure   ARX

Rounds      20

DES

Designers   IBM

First published   1975

Derived from      Lucifer

Successors  Triple DES, G-DES, DES-X, LOKI89, ICE

Cipher detail

Key sizes   56 bits (+8 parity bits)

Block sizes 64 bits

Structure   Balanced Feistel network

Rounds      16

DES/CBC/NOPADDING

 

DES/CBC/PKCS5PADDING

 

DES/ECB/NOPADDING

 

DES/ECB/PKCS5PADDING

 

DESEDE

First published   1998 (ANS X9.52)

Derived from      DES

Cipher detail

Key sizes   168, 112 or 56 bits (keying option 1, 2, 3 respectively)

Block sizes 64 bits

Structure   Feistel network

Rounds      48 DES-equivalent rounds

DESEDE/CBC/NOPADDING

 

DESEDE/CBC/PKCS5PADDING

 

DESEDE/ECB/NOPADDING

 

DESEDE/ECB/PKCS5PADDING

 

GCM

Galois/Counter Mode

GOST28147

 

GRAIN128

 

GRAINV1

 

HC128

 

HC256

 

IDEA

Designers   Xuejia Lai and James Massey

Derived from      PES

Successors  MMB, MESH, Akelarre,

IDEA NXT (FOX)

Cipher detail

Key sizes   128 bits

Block sizes 64 bits

Structure   Lai-Massey scheme

Rounds      8.5

NOEKEON

 

PBEWITHSHA1ANDRC4_128

PBKDF1 and PBKDF2 (Password-Based Key Derivation Function 2)

PBEWITHSHA1ANDRC4_40

PBKDF1 and PBKDF2 (Password-Based Key Derivation Function 2)

RC2

Designers   Ron Rivest (RSA Security) designed in 1987)

Cipher detail

Key sizes   40–2048 bits

State size  2064 bits (1684 effective)

Rounds      1

RC5

Designers   Ron Rivest

First published   1994

Successors  RC6, Akelarre

Cipher detail

Key sizes   0 to 2040 bits (128 suggested)

Block sizes 32, 64 or 128 bits (64 suggested)

Structure   Feistel-like network

Rounds      1-255

RC6

 

RIJNDAEL

The Advanced Encryption Standard (AES), also called Rijndael

SALSA20

 

SEED

 

SHACAL-2

 

SKIPJACK

Designers   NSA

First published   1998 (declassified)

Cipher detail

Key sizes   80 bits

Block sizes 64 bits

Structure   unbalanced Feistel network[1]

Rounds      32

SM4

 

SERPENT

 

SHACAL2

 

TEA

 

THREEFISH

Designers   Bruce Schneier, Niels Ferguson, Stefan Lucks, Doug Whiting, Mihir Bellare, Tadayoshi Kohno, Jon Callas, Jesse Walker

First published   2008

Related to  Blowfish, Twofish

Cipher detail

Key sizes   256, 512 or 1024 bits

(key size is equal to block size)

Block sizes 256, 512 or 1024 bits

Rounds      72 (80 for 1024-bit block size)

TNEPRES

 

TWOFISH

Designers   Bruce Schneier

First published   1998

Derived from      Blowfish, SAFER, Square

Related to  Threefish

Certification     AES finalist

Cipher detail

Key sizes   128, 192 or 256 bits

Block sizes 128 bits

Structure   Feistel network

Rounds      16

VMPC

 

VMPC-KSA3

 

XTEA

 

 

 

Cipher modes

  • Electronic Code Book (ECB)
  • Cipher Block Chaining (CBC)
  • Cipher Feedback (CFB)
  • Output Feedback (OFB)

Electronic Code Book

  • Native encryption mode
  • Provides the recipe of substitutions and permutations that will be performed on the block of plaintext.
  • Data within a file does not have to be encrypted in a certain order.
  • Used for small amounts of data, like challenge-response, key management tasks.
  • Also used to encrypt PINs in ATM machines.

Cipher Block Chaining

  • Each block of text, the key, and the value based on the previous block is processed in the algorithm and applied to the next block of text.

Cipher Feedback

  • The previously generated ciphertext from the last encrypted block of data is inputted into the algorithm to generate random values.
  • These random values are processed with the current block of plaintext to create ciphertext.
  • This mode is used when encrypting individual characters is required.

Output Feedback

  • Functioning like a stream cipher by generating a stream of random binary bits to be combined with the plaintext to create ciphertext.
  • The ciphertext is fed back to the algorithm to form a portion of the next input to encrypt the next stream of bits.
  • DES has been broken with Internet network of PC’s

DES is considered vulnerable by brute force search of the key – replaced by triple DES and AES 

Triple DES

  • Double encryption is subject to meet in the middle attack
  • Encrypt on one end decrypt on the other and compare the values
  • So Triple DES is used
  • Can be done several different ways:
    • DES – EDE2 (encrypt key 1, decrypt key 2, encrypt key 1)
    • DES – EE2 (encrypt key 1, encrypt key 2, encrypt key 1)
    • DES –EE3 (encrypt key 1, encrypt key 2, encrypt key 3) - most secure
  • Advanced Encryption Standard
  • Block Cipher that will replace DES
  • Anticipated that Triple DES will remain approved for Government Use
  • AES announced by NIST in January 1997 to find replacement for DES

5 Finalists

  • MARS
  • RC6
  • Rijndael
  • Serpent
  • Blowfish